Congratulations Barack Obama


 

 

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I read Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance  by Barack Obama4 years ago.  I have been fascinated with the man since.  He told a story of his life without grandiosity and with questions rather than doctrines.  Now he has come this far.  He is young, vibrant and hard-working.  He deserves this he has overcome a great deal to get here.  I am proud to see this man in the position he is currently in, no matter what comes next.  I do, in fact fear for him.  I am a lover of history and with that know that the good die young and that fanaticism runs rampant.  Yet, I have hope.  I need to believe and he is someone who I believe in . 

 

Book Review of Dreams from My Father:

Obama argues with himself on almost every page of this lively autobiographical conversation. He gets you to agree with him, and then he brings in a counter-narrative that seems just as convincing. Son of a white American mother and of a black Kenyan father whom he never knew, Obama grew up mainly in Hawaii. After college, he worked for three years as a community organizer on Chicago’s South Side. Then, finally, he went to Kenya, to find the world of his dead father, his “authentic” self. Will the truth set you free, Obama asks? Or will it disappoint? Both, it seems. His search for himself as a black American is rooted in the particulars of his daily life; it also reads like a wry commentary about all of us. He dismisses stereotypes of the “tragic mulatto” and then shows how much we are all caught between messy contradictions and disparate communities. He discovers that Kenya has 400 different tribes, each of them with stereotypes of the others. Obama is candid about racism and poverty and corruption, in Chicago and in Kenya. Yet he does find community and authenticity, not in any romantic cliche{‚}, but with “honest, decent men and women who have attainable ambitions and the determination to see them through.” by Hazel Rochman


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